Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones

This is a simple small batch recipe for Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones that are soft and tender, with perfectly crispy edges.  The scones are made with cream to make them soft, and strawberry jam is delicately swirled throughout.  The scones then get topped with more jam plus a creamy peanut butter glaze – perfect for breakfast or a light snack!

Close up of a peanut butter and jelly scone

Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones Recipe

Scones are easy to make and this recipe for Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones is no different!  Scones are often referred to as a quick bread – meaning they don’t require yeast to make them rise.  Instead, the use of a leavening agent – like baking powder or baking soda – is used to lift the bread as it bakes.  

For this scones recipe, I use a combination of baking powder and baking soda to help give the scones a little boost to rise.  Additionally, I like to use baking soda because it helps to tenderize the scones.  Because, if you’re like me, you have experienced a scone that is super dry and reminiscent of cardboard.  These are not those scones!

These scones, are more reminiscent of the classic peanut butter and jelly sandwich that were on repeat in our brown bag lunches!  Or, maybe that was just me because that was the easiest sandwich for me to make 🙂

  • Peanut Butter – The peanut butter in the scones is featured on top in the creamy peanut butter glaze.  And the great thing, you can make the glaze as rich in peanut butter flavor as you like!  I loosen it with a little milk and powdered sugar, but that doesn’t mean you can’t just smear some on the top straight from the jar!
  • Jelly – In this case, we are actually using jam.  Which is just a chunkier fruit version of jelly.  A little fruit jam is swirled into the scone dough.  And for good measure, we brush some on top before baking the scones.
A stack of peanut butter and jelly scones

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Scone Flavors

One of the many great things about scones is that they are very versatile when it comes to flavoring them.  You can add a variety of mix-in’s, flavors, and seasonings.  I’ve included some ideas below – with a couple directly from the blog!

  • Cherry Cornmeal Scones – These are fun because they are topped with a sweetened cornflake crunch.
  • Orange Almond Scones – Almond paste gives these scones a subtly sweet flavor – great with tea!
  • Chocolate Chip – Using this recipe, you can swap out the jelly for some chocolate chips.  Your call if you want to still use the peanut butter glaze … no judgement here!
  • Blueberry – Blueberries – or any berry for that matter! – would be a great swap in using the Cherry Cornmeal Scone recipe.
  • Caramel Apple – How about a fall inspired flavored scone?  Simply sauté 1/2 cup of chopped apples with 2 tablespoons of brown sugar and 1 tablespoon of butter and follow the recipe below.  Omitting the peanut butter and jelly, of course.
  • Chai Spice – This is on my list to bake, and perfect for Fall.  Use the base recipe below and add 2 teaspoons of Chai spices.  
  • Savory Herbs – The options are vast when it comes to savory scones.  You can try 2 teaspoons of rosemary + sage + thyme for the holidays.  Or how about some garlic and cheddar?

What You Need To Make Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones

Ingredients

  • All Purpose Flour
  • Granulated Sugar
  • Baking Powder and Baking Soda – I use both for rise and help make the scones tender.
  • Salt
  • Unsalted Butter – Cold, cold butter!  And, I recommend grating butter because it distributes evenly into the dough (pictured below).
  • Egg Yolk – The egg yolk adds flavor and structure.
  • Heavy Cream – Cream is what helps to make these scones soft and tender.  You could also use buttermilk for a slightly tangy flavor.
  • Milk – For the peanut butter glaze.
  • Fruit Jam – Any flavor you prefer will work.  I would recommend using jam, because I think if offers more structure and flavor with the crushed fruit.  
  • Creamy Peanut Butter – I recommend creamy peanut butter since we are using it to make a glaze.
  • Powdered Sugar – A little sweetness and structure for the peanut butter glaze.
 

Baking Equipment

  • Baking Sheet
  • Parchment Paper
  • Mixing Bowls

Tips For Making Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones

The Butter And Cold Ingredients

  • Use cold, cold butter – The colder, the better.  I recommend grating the butter then sticking in the freezer until ready to use.  Or, you can freeze a stick of butter the night before, and grate it frozen.  
    • Why do you have to use cold butter in scones (or biscuits, like the Buttermilk Biscuits)?  
      1. Because when the butter is super cold, it won’t melt before it is baked.  Leaving it to melt in the oven to create the perfect scone texture.  Otherwise, your scones may spread into cookies when baked.   
      2. Butter contains water.  And when that cold water is heated, it creates steam.  And that steam creates air pockets all around the little pieces of butter.  Which results in a light and flaky texture in the scones.  
  • Grate the butterGrate the cold butter on a box grater on the large holes.  I find this method for incorporating the butter into the flour is easier and it distributes the butter evenly.  Alternative methods like cutting the butter in with a pastry cutter, forks, or your fingers, will overheat the butter.  See reason #1 above.  
  • Cold liquid ingredients – This goes along with the cold butter, but all of the liquid ingredients – egg yolk, cream, and jam, should be cold.  I will measure all of the ingredients out first, then let them sit in the refrigerator until ready to use.
  • Use heavy cream – There is more fat in heavy cream which will yield a softer scone.  

Mixing The Dough

  • Don’t overwork the dough – We want the scones to be light and tender.  Overworking the dough causes the gluten in the flour to form, which will result in a dense and chewy scone.  I recommend a wooden spoon to mix the dough into a rough, shaggy dough.  When forming the dough into a disc, use your hands.  And the disc does not have to be perfect! 
  • Refrigerate before baking (if needed) – If you feel you have been a little too heavy-handed with your dough, or if it is a super hot day, refrigerated the cut scones before baking for about 15 minutes. 
  • No need to over-mix the jam into the dough – Mix for a couple strokes to just incorporate the jam.  It can be swirled throughout, and does not need to be mixed in completely.  And keep in mind, we add more jam to the top of the scones before they are baked.

Peanut Butter and Jelly

  • Creamy peanut butter – I think this is the best option for making a glaze.  And I recommend a peanut butter that does not need to be stirred because we don’t want the glaze to be oily.
  • Fruit jam – I actually use jam in the recipe and recommend it because it has a more intense fruit flavor and texture.  And, any fruit jam flavor you prefer will work great!
Quick bread scones on a small plate

Common Questions For Making Homemade Scones

Can this recipe be doubled?

I haven’t tested it, but I don’t see why not. I would recommend using 2 egg yolks (vs. a whole egg) because the egg yolks add a richness and flavor.

Why does the butter have to be so cold?

Cold butter creates the soft and flaky texture we want in the scone. Otherwise, your scones may spread into cookies when baked, and be flat and dense.

Do I have to grate the butter?

I recommend grating the butter because it is easier, it distributes into the flour evenly, and you avoid overworking the butter trying to get it into small pieces.

Can I use regular milk instead of cream?

I recommend cream or buttermilk for the scones. While I have not tested it, I think regular milk may cause the scones to be flat.

Do I have to use fruit jam in the scone? Or can I just use it on top?

You can certainly omit the jam from the scone dough and just brush it on top.

Can I add chocolate chips or nuts into the dough?

Of course! I’d start with 4 to 6 tablespoons. You can also place some on top before baking too.

What kind of peanut butter do you recommend for the glaze?

I recommend a creamy peanut butter that does not require to be stirred. Otherwise, the glaze may be too oily.

How do you store scones?

Scones store great covered at room temperature for about a day or two. Beyond that, they have a tendency to dry out.

Small batch of quick bread treats on a table

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Peanut butter scones on a small plate
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Small Batch Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones

This is a simple small batch recipe for Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones that are soft and tender, with perfectly crispy edges.  Strawberry jam is swirled throughout, then the scones are topped with more jam plus a peanut butter glaze.
Prep15 mins
Cook13 mins
Total28 mins
Servings: 4 Scones
Author: Erin | Butter and Bliss

Ingredients

Scones

  • 1 cup + 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold - I recommend grating the cold butter on a box grater.
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 3 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons fruit jam - any flavor you prefer; plus more to brush on top of the scones

Peanut Butter Glaze

  • 1 to 2 tablespoons creamy peanut butter - more or less to taste
  • 1 tablespoon milk, any kind
  • 1/4 cup powdered sugar

Instructions

Scones

  • Preheat the oven to 400F degrees and adjust the oven rack to the middle position. Line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper.
  • In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  • In a liquid measuring cup, add the cream and egg yolk. Stir until thoroughly mixed.
  • Add the grated butter to the dry ingredients and stir to coat the butter pieces. Then pour the liquid ingredients over the top. Stir until just mixed. Drizzle the fruit jam into the dough and stir a few times to just create a jam swirl in the dough. Do not over-work the dough – it should be rough and shaggy.
  • Turn the dough out onto the center of the prepared baking sheet. Gently pat the dough together into 5-inch ball, and flatten ever so slightly. Cut the disc into 4 equal size wedges. Brush the tops of the scones with a little fruit jam. Note – If you feel like the dough has been a little over-worked, and the butter has started to melt, place the shaped scones in the refrigerator for 15 minutes before baking.
  • Bake for 13 – 15 minutes, or until the scones are golden brown. Transfer the baked scones to a wire cooling rack to cool.

Peanut Butter Glaze

  • As the scones are cooling, make the glaze – ln a small bowl add the peanut butter, milk, and powdered sugar. Whisk until combined and smooth. Note – Add 2 tablespoons of peanut butter if you prefer a strong peanut butter flavor. You can also add more or less milk to reach your desired glaze consistency.
  • Drizzle or spoon the glaze on top of the cool scones. The scones are best enjoyed the day they are baked. Enjoy!

Notes

  • Use cold, cold butter – The colder, the better.  I recommend grating the butter then sticking in the freezer until ready to use. 
  • Grate the butterGrate the cold butter on a box grater on the large holes.  I find this method for incorporating the butter into the flour is easier and it distributes the butter evenly. 
  • Cold liquid ingredients – The egg yolk, cream, and jam, should be cold.   You can measure all of the ingredients out first, then let them sit in the refrigerator until ready to use.
  • Don’t overwork the dough –  Overworking the dough causes the gluten in the flour to form, which will result in a dense and chewy scone.  I recommend a wooden spoon to mix the dough into a rough, shaggy dough.  When forming the dough into a disc, use your hands.  And the disc does not have to be perfect! 
  • Refrigerate before baking (if needed) – If you feel you have been a little too heavy-handed with your dough, or if it is a super hot day, refrigerated the cut scones before baking for about 15 minutes. 
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: American
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